February 19, 2009 | 4:02
Acceptance!  If you don’t get accepted into the NYC Marathon via their lottery for 3 consecutive years, you get a guaranteed entry.  I have been volunteering with Achilles during those non-selected years, but once in a while it’s great to do the race as an official entry.

Acceptance!  If you don’t get accepted into the NYC Marathon via their lottery for 3 consecutive years, you get a guaranteed entry.  I have been volunteering with Achilles during those non-selected years, but once in a while it’s great to do the race as an official entry.

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January 26, 2009 | 1:01
caryrandolph:
So, so, so much better than expected, and when I consider that I didn’t cross the start line to activate my chip until two minutes after the clock started (as is standard in races with so many participants), that the wind chill was a brutal five degrees, that I broke my usual eight-minute-mile pace, that it all felt so incredibly easy……Bronx Half-Marathon in two weeks?
Inspiration.

caryrandolph:

So, so, so much better than expected, and when I consider that I didn’t cross the start line to activate my chip until two minutes after the clock started (as is standard in races with so many participants), that the wind chill was a brutal five degrees, that I broke my usual eight-minute-mile pace, that it all felt so incredibly easy

Bronx Half-Marathon in two weeks?

Inspiration.

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January 23, 2009 | 7:22 | TAGGED: stretching
beautifulyou:

And Bend and Stretch!
Stretching is the deliberate lengthening of muscles in order to increase muscle flexibility and joint range of motion. Stretching activities are an important part of any exercise or rehabilitation program. They help warm the body up prior to activity thus decreasing the risk of injury as well as muscle soreness. The benefits of stretching are many and have been proven through various studies over time. Stretching benefits people of all ages, and is intended for the young as well as the elderly population.
The Benefits of Stretching According to the Mayo Clinic, the top five benefits of stretching include:  *Increased flexibility and joint range of motion: Flexible muscles can improve your daily performance. Tasks such as lifting packages, bending to tie your shoes or hurrying to catch a bus become easier and less tiring. Flexibility tends to diminish as you get older, but you can regain and maintain it.  *Improved circulation: Stretching increases blood flow to your muscles. Blood flowing to your muscles brings nourishment and gets rid of waste byproducts in the muscle tissue. Improved circulation can help shorten your recovery time if you’ve had any muscle injuries. *Better posture: Frequent stretching can help keep your muscles from getting tight, allowing you to maintain proper posture. Good posture can minimize discomfort and keep aches and pains at a minimum.  *Stress relief: Stretching relaxes tight, tense muscles that often accompany stress.  *Enhanced coordination: Maintaining the full range-of-motion through your joints keeps you in better balance. Coordination and balance will help keep you mobile and less prone to injury from falls, especially as you get older.
Stretch it out.

beautifulyou:

And Bend and Stretch!

Stretching is the deliberate lengthening of muscles in order to increase muscle flexibility and joint range of motion. Stretching activities are an important part of any exercise or rehabilitation program. They help warm the body up prior to activity thus decreasing the risk of injury as well as muscle soreness.
The benefits of stretching are many and have been proven through various studies over time. Stretching benefits people of all ages, and is intended for the young as well as the elderly population.

The Benefits of Stretching
According to the Mayo Clinic, the top five benefits of stretching include:
*Increased flexibility and joint range of motion:
Flexible muscles can improve your daily performance. Tasks such as lifting packages, bending to tie your shoes or hurrying to catch a bus become easier and less tiring. Flexibility tends to diminish as you get older, but you can regain and maintain it.
*Improved circulation:
Stretching increases blood flow to your muscles. Blood flowing to your muscles brings nourishment and gets rid of waste byproducts in the muscle tissue. Improved circulation can help shorten your recovery time if you’ve had any muscle injuries.
*Better posture:
Frequent stretching can help keep your muscles from getting tight, allowing you to maintain proper posture. Good posture can minimize discomfort and keep aches and pains at a minimum.
*Stress relief:
Stretching relaxes tight, tense muscles that often accompany stress.
*Enhanced coordination:
Maintaining the full range-of-motion through your joints keeps you in better balance. Coordination and balance will help keep you mobile and less prone to injury from falls, especially as you get older.

Stretch it out.

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January 21, 2009 | 4:03 | TAGGED: map running
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January 18, 2009 | 5:14

A snowy Sunday morning and some quick advice.

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January 6, 2009 | 12:26

restlessruminations:

emilyposts:

Ohmigoodness! I am so torn about whether or not I should join this run club. I went today to buy shoes and some gear for running outside in the cold. (I saved all the receipts in case I decided to return them.) It starts in February and we begin by training for a 7K that’s in May. I want to do it, but I’m seriously doubting that I can, and I do not want to be the girl that quits.

They have some great runs throughout the year including a dog run in July. It sounds tempting, but sooooo hard. I have never been a runner, and I’m just not feeling that positive about it.

Here is the schedule:

  • Week 1 – Walk 10 minutes, jog 2 minutes
  • Week 2 – Walk 6 minutes, jog 4 minutes
  • Week 3 – Walk 6 minutes, jog 6 minutes
  • Week 4 – Walk 4 minutes, jog 8 minutes
  • Week 5 – Walk 3 minutes, jog 10 minutes
  • Week 6 – Walk 2 minutes, jog 12 minutes
  • Week 7 – Walk 6 minutes, jog 16 minutes
  • Week 8 – Walk 5 minutes, jog 20 minutes
  • Week 9 – Walk 5 minutes, jog 30 minutes, walk 5 minutes
  • Week 10 – Walk 5 minutes, jog 35 minutes, walk 5 minutes

What to do…

As someone who was never a runner yet went on to run marathons, I feel the need to tell you (even without knowing you!) that you are totally capable of this. Two years ago I started running short distances, just a little at a time. When my friend joined a marathon training club, I tagged along only to challenge myself to run longer distances. I never dreamed I would actually run a marathon, let alone three in the same year. But really, truly, all it takes is dedication: putting one foot in front of the other. If you show up and train with a group and stick to the schedule, your body will totally respond and you’ll meet the new running challenge each week. The distance may seem daunting at first, but it’s just a matter of building endurance week after week.

I was always intimidated by the idea of running long distance, but it was so rewarding once I actually got in the habit of doing it. So if you are looking for any extra encouragement, here it is!! Good luck with your decision!!

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December 13, 2008 | 5:04

Confession

It’s been two months since my last run.

During the marathon (which was actually my last run) I began experiencing severe pain in my left knee. I ran through it (it started at mile 9), and took tylenol around mile 18, and ran/walked the last few miles. I had easily run 18 miles before the marathon, so it was a bit of a disappointment, but I found my knee still hurting a month later so I went to the doctor. He sent me to a physical therapist, and I just finished my second session/week of retraining my kneecap how to track over my knee.

I had been having problems with my IT band all through out training, but I was managing it with yoga and ballet. When it came time for the marathon, which was in SF, the road grades were so steep (up, down, and to the side) that my IT tightened up a bit more, and my muscles could no longer fight it. My IT began pulling my kneecap over to the side, and therefore causing it to rub on things it is not supposed to. It’s super painful, and I’ve been taking anti-inflammatories to ease some of the irritation, but I basically have to retrain my muscles how to control my kneecap.

This past session of PT I got on the treadmill and within 2 minutes I had pain. So I got off, the doc looked at my knee, and then taped my kneecap in place. I did a few strengthening exercises, got an IT massage (which feels like glass cutting into your leg), and then hopped back on the treadmill once my knee pain subsided. I ran three more minutes before it started getting a little bit uncomfortable, but it was noticeably more comfortable running with my knee taped.

I can’t begin to express how much I miss running. It was like a breath of fresh air to run, even if it was for a total of 5 minutes. Running has changed my life, and so much for the better. I had asthma problems, and running made them go away. I had heart problems, and running made them go away. I had stress, and running made it go away. I eat better, I sleep better, and I feel better (not to mention all of my clothes fit better). I have even noticed how running a marathon changed the way I perceive and tackle problems. It was a slow start to get in the groove, but once I did, it made all the difference in the world.

I can’t wait to get back there, and once I do I’m dragging all of you with me!

-submitted by MDF

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November 24, 2008 | 2:18
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November 19, 2008 | 9:36
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November 13, 2008 | 11:17
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November 6, 2008 | 1:25
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November 5, 2008 | 9:30
2008 NYC Marathon - At the Finish Line - 10 hours 5 minutes

2008 NYC Marathon - At the Finish Line - 10 hours 5 minutes

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November 3, 2008 | 8:33
Achilles Japan participant Miyoko Tanaka and our great team.
On the Verrazano Bridge and less than 26 miles to go.

Achilles Japan participant Miyoko Tanaka and our great team.

On the Verrazano Bridge and less than 26 miles to go.

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